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Cawsand Bay – Cracking Little Anchorage near Plymouth!

Located on the western side of Plymouth Sound, Cawsand Bay is a beautiful, sweeping bay with good holding and good protection from any west in the wind. It is the perfect stopover for those exploring the West Country who may not wish to head into Plymouth itself.

The anchorage can get quite busy, especially at weekends, however it is reasonably big so you should always find a spot, just steer clear of the local moorings near the beach. It makes a great viewing spot for all the vessels navigating the main channel around the breakwater, although this can sometimes cause a bit of a swell to pass through causing that inevitable and uncomfortable roll!

Cawsand Bay Beach

It is possible to leave your dinghy on the shingle beach and head into the village of Cawsand and its neighbouring village Kingsand. Although anchored in ‘Plymouth’ once you step ashore here you are now in Cornwall. This delightful little area has a couple of traditional pubs and a small Spar shop which stocks ample supplies to tie you over until you can get to a bigger store. During the season a ferry runs from Cawsand beach to the Barbican in the centre of Plymouth and if you fancy a bit of a hike then you can pickup the South West Coast Path here for walks either west to Rame Head or east towards Cremyll.

Kayaks and SUP’S can be hired from the watersports centre on the beach or alternatively jump in the water, the bay is perfect for a spot of sea swimming – if the temperature permits!

Easterly Wind forces us to move to Jennycliff Bay Anchorage

Anchorage at Jennycliff Bay

We found Cawsand Bay to be rather delightful, so much so we stayed for a few nights. However the wind was switching to a strong North East/East, making Cawsand a bit of a lee shore. With that in mind we pulled up the anchor and made the short journey across the Sound to Jennycliff Bay on the other side, passing ‘The World‘ en route, the largest residential ship in the world with 165 apartments/suites. She has a number of restaurants onboard plus a spa, fitness studio and theatre. Travelling across 5 continents she brings a whole new meaning to the term ‘liveaboard’ with her floating apartments!

‘The World’ Residential Cruise Ship

On our arrival we found that seahorses had moved in thus meaning an area was now buoyed off. We dropped the hook outside of the no anchoring zone but with the wind blowing hard from the North/North-East and the ominous cliffs behind us looking slightly close we didn’t feel overly comfortable. To top things off a fishing boat then decided to drop right on top of where we had anchored – there were only two boats in the bay and plenty of room so why they did this is beyond us! But it confirmed our decision – we would move again!

Anchoring in Batten Bay below Mountbatten Point

Batten Bay Anchorage with Plymouth Skyline at Sunset

We dropped the hook at 50˚21.372N 4˚07.839W in 7 metres of water. We immediately felt happier, with more room around us and safe in the knowledge that if we dragged we would clear any rocks. We initially had 35 metres of chain out but as the wind blew up to 30 knots we dumped another 5 metres. We stayed 2 nights here and the Mantus Anchor we had installed earlier this year held like a charm! We were also treated to the sounds of a music festival on nearby Plymouth Hoe which sounded pretty awesome; it was just a shame we couldn’t go ashore!

VIDEO: Anchorage at Cawsands

Sit back and soak up the relaxing vibes from onboard as we chill at anchor in Cawsand Bay, one of our favourite anchorages on the South West!

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