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Howth and Malahide

The weather just wasn’t playing ball for us this summer! We had hoped to visit Howth and Malahide with the yacht however the constant periods of low pressure meant finding a good day to head up there was proving difficult. With Storm Antoni now approaching we made the decision to stay in the safety of Dun Laoghaire Marina, and take the DART up to visit the popular seaside villages of Howth and Malahide.

Howth

Howth is a picturesque seaside harbour located on the Howth Peninsula, north-east of Dublin. A busy, thriving fishing community operates out of here so no surprise then that most of the local restaurants specialise in seafood dishes. It’s these fishing vessels that probably attract the seals; Howth is known for having a couple of local seals!

Howth Harbour

Howth Yacht Club is one of Ireland’s premier sailing clubs and they welcome visitors. However do be aware that they have limited availability so it is strongly advised that you contact beforehand to request a berth.

Howth is a popular destination for walkers keen to explore this stunning headland. For the less adventurous enjoy a leisurely stroll out one of the piers with views over to Ireland’s Eye, or if you’re up for a good hike then there are many trails on Howth Head rewarding you with breathtaking scenery of the cliffs and coastline.

Ireland’s Eye Island

We enjoyed a spot of lunch at Leo Burdock – known for their famous fish ‘n’ chips. Established in 1913 they have welcomed a host of celebrities over the years, a list they’re particularly proud of – https://www.leoburdock.com/hall-of-fame/! The portion sizes are very generous and we’d highly recommend it.

Malahide

Hoping back on the DART we back tracked to Howth Junction & Donaghmede to change for Malahide. This scenic village is located approximately 14kms north of Dublin and you’ll find a number of quaint independent boutiques, pubs and restaurants.

Probably its most famous attraction is Malahide Castle & Gardens. Dating back some 800 years the castle is set in 260 acres of parkland and features a walled garden, butterfly house and magical fairy trail. Entry to the parkland is free though tickets are required to enter the castle, gardens and trail.

Malahide Castle

Malahide Marina is a fully serviced marina with 350 berths. Despite not being able to visit with our own yacht we did call in and they were most welcoming, with very good facilities.

Malahide Marina

Nearby are the beautiful beaches of North Dublin with long stretches of golden sands, tall grasses and rolling dunes. Do be aware though that the tidal currents are strong here in the estuary so do check signs before jumping in!

A Yacht Exiting Malahide

Out of the two, Malahide would be our preference to visit again by boat. It is also a great location for those wishing to visit Dublin, located just 10 miles outside of the city. The marina was spacious with good facilities including a boat yard and chandlery. The village and all its amenities is within walking distance as are the beautiful coastal walks.

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